Ogham Stones And Ancient Irish Writing

Standing Stone in Bantry, County Cork

Ogham (pronounced oh-am) is an ancient form of Irish writing comprised of patterns of parallel strokes to the side or across a continuous line. Image Credit Well, that’s the technical explanation of this old Celtic form of communication, but for me the very word brings to mind images of ancient stones pointing skyward in mystical […]

Congratulations To Emerald Heritage

Emerald Heritage Logo-001

I love sharing success stories with an Irish twist and today I’m delighted to share some wonderful news of Emerald Heritage’s ongoing accomplishments and accolades. This year Emerald Heritage will reach a global audience of 60 million viewers when it is featured on two international travel programs. The Glens of Antrim earned a well deserved […]

Ireland’s Round Towers

St. Kevin's Tower, Glendalough, County Wicklow

Slender, tapering, stone towers dot the Irish countryside from the northern county of Antrim to Ireland’s most southern county of Cork. Image Credit The harp and the shamrock are obvious choices for the honorary title of “symbol of Ireland”, but today I once again wish to elevate another emblem to this distinguished title – the […]

Furze – The Yellow Flower Of The Irish Landscape


Ireland’s hills and hedgerows are blooming with the golden glow of yellow furze. This prolific plant adds stunning color to the Irish landscape each and every year. A Plant Of Many Names:   Now this hill brightening plant bears many names throughout Ireland. I grew up calling it furze. In northern counties this landscape illuminator […]

Knocknarea And Queen Maeve of Connacht.


Knocknarea dominates County Sligo’s skyline, and together with Ben Bulben, these two peaks are the most striking landmarks in the entire county. Today I thought it’s high time for a scenic interlude, and what better subject matter or mountainous model could there be for a blog post, than the magnificent Knocknarea in County Sligo. So […]

Remembering Easter Monday 1916 Plus Introducing The Easter Commemoration Digest


On Easter Monday 1916, nearly ninety-nine years ago, Patrick Pearse and the Irish Volunteers, assembled at various prearranged meeting points in Dublin, in a bid to win Irish freedom from British rule. Image Credit   The Irish Proclamation of Independence:   At four minutes past noon on Easter Monday, April 24th, 1916, Patrick Pearse read […]

Ancient Stones And Passage Tombs – A Ramble Around Knowth, County Meath

Ogham Writing on a Stone at Knowth

County Meath in Ireland is home to many prehistoric megalithic tombs built around 3200 BC. Newgrange is the most famous archaeological site in Ireland, but it’s neighboring site of Knowth is well worth a visit. Image Credit We took a tour of this historical gem last summer, and to tell you the truth my kids […]

The History And Origins Of St. Patrick


Today we celebrate St. Patrick, and everything that is Irish – our customs and culture, our language, our heritage, our food and drink. And I raise my glass to you – the readers of my blog. Thank you all for following my ramblings and recipes. I appreciate your support and your comments throughout my years […]

The Meaning of Some Popular Irish Last Names


Many of us bear Irish last names or surnames as we say in Ireland. But have you ever wondered about the origins of these Irish names? Image Credit What are the most common Irish last names found world wide? From where in Ireland do these family names hail? What is the most common surname in […]

Ireland – A Land of Trees In The Time Of Saint Patrick


Trees and forestry played both practical and spiritual roles in the lives of Irish people throughout the centuries. Today Ireland is home to some beautiful woods and forestry, but the number of trees pales in comparison to the vast numbers of living trees on the island before the 17th century. Emerald Heritage, a conservation business […]

Irish Famine Pots


Famine pots are giant cast iron vessels, which were created to cook large volumes of soup to feed the starving Irish in 1847, the bleakest year of Ireland’s Great Hunger, now known as ‘Black 47’. Mattie Lennon, a reader of my blog, and an avid Dublin folklorist, poet and author, contacted me to let me […]