Scotch Eggs

Scotch eggs are whole hard boiled eggs, wrapped in sausage meat, then dipped in bread crumbs, before being deep-fried.

Now this recipe may have originated across the Irish Sea in England or Scotland, but Irish people have embraced these picnic eggs since their inception.

 

When I make Scotch eggs here in America, I avoid using American sausage, because I find it a little too spicy.  The end result is still delicious, but the Scotch eggs just taste different to the Irish ones I miss.

Instead I use ground pork which I season before wrapping the hard boiled eggs. Feel free to use any sausage meat you enjoy, but for a true taste of Ireland or England, here’s how I make them.

Ingredients

  • 4 large eggs

For Sausage Meat

  • 1lb ground pork
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1 teaspoon dried parsley
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried marjoram
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried basil
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried rosemary
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried sage
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper

For Dredging

  • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 and 1/2 cup breadcrumbs
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon onion powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon paprika

For Deep Frying

  • canola or vegetable oil

 

Place four of the eggs into a saucepan and cover them with cold water.  Bring the water to a boil, then lower the heat and simmer for 5 minutes.  Now if making hard boiled eggs for other recipes you would simmer them a little longer.  However, I find if I over-boil the eggs they really get overcooked during the deep-frying process.

Once the eggs are ready transfer them to ice cold water to stop the cooking process.  Allow them to cool, then carefully remove their shells under running cold water.

Next I prepare the sausage meat.  Add the ground pork to a large mixing bowl, and season by throwing in the thyme, parsley, marjoram, basil, rosemary, sage, salt and pepper.

I probably should write “parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme”, then add the other spices to the list.  I can’t help singing the old song as I make this sausage.

Next I divide the sausage meat into four equal portions.

Lay one quarter of the sausage on a plate, or cutting board, or on wax paper.  Flatten it into a circular shape.  Lay one hard-boiled egg in the center, then mold the sausage meat around the egg.

Completely encase each egg in sausage.  They are now ready for the final dredging and crumbing stage.

Prepare the breadcrumbs by adding the garlic and onion powders, the oregano, paprika, salt and pepper.  Mix well through the breadcrumbs.

Now it’s time to prepare your dunking stations.  Add the flour to a flat bowl or rimmed plate.  Whisk the last two eggs in another bowl, and line up the prepared breadcrumbs as the last dipping spot.

Roll one sausage covered egg at a time in the flour to completely dredge the surface.

Next transfer it to the egg wash and give it a good bath completely wetting the surface.  The flour helps the egg to stick to the surface.

Finally add the egg to the breadcrumb bowl.  Give it a good roll around to cover the whole surface in crumbs.

Here are my four Scotch eggs waiting for their oil bath.

Pour canola or vegetable oil into a deep fat fryer or into a heavy cast iron skillet.  I use my Dutch oven.  Cover the bottom of the pan with about 3 inches of oil, but never fill the skillet more than half way.

Heat the oil to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.  Lower the eggs into the oil, cooking them two at a time.  Fry them for 6 to 8 minutes until the outside is golden brown and crisp.

Remove them from the oil using a slotted metal spoon.  Drain them on paper towels.

Serve them hot or cold with mustard or any dipping sauce you enjoy. They are perfect as appetizers or make a truly delicious lunch.

Here is the printable recipe.

Scotch Eggs

Serves 4
Prep time 30 minutes
Cook time 20 minutes
Total time 50 minutes
Meal type Appetizer, Lunch
Region British
Scotch eggs are whole hard boiled eggs, wrapped in sausage meat, then dipped in bread crumbs, before being deep-fried.

Ingredients

  • 6 Large eggs (4 eggs for hard-boiling and 2 for egg wash)
  • 1lb ground pork
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1 teaspoon dried parsley
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried marjoram
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried basil
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried rosemary
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried sage
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 and 1/2 cup breadcrumbs
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon onion powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon paprika
  • canola or vegetable oil (for deep frying)

Directions

Step 1 Place 4 eggs in a saucepan covering them with cold water. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat and simmer for 5 minutes. Immerse in ice water to halt the cooking process. When cooled remove the shells carefully under running cold water..
Step 2 Add the ground pork to a large bowl. Season with thyme, parsley, marjoram, basil, rosemary, sage, salt and pepper. Mix thoroughly to combine. Divide meat mixture into four equal quarters.
Step 3 Prepare the dredging ingredients by adding the flour to a flat bowl. Whisk two eggs in a separate bowl. Season the bread crumbs with garlic powder, onion powder, oregano, salt, pepper and paprika in a third flat bowl.
Step 4 Place one quarter of the sausage meat onto a plate and flatten it into a round. Lay one hard boiled egg in the center, then wrap the sausage meat around the egg to completely cover it. Repeat with each portion of sausage meat and each egg.
Step 5 Prepare the eggs for deep frying by dredging them in flour, then dipping them in egg wash, before rolling them in seasoned breadcrumbs.
Step 6 Pour vegetable or canola oil into a deep fryer or large heavy skillet to a level of 3 inches. Never fill your pan more than half-way with oil. Heat the oil to 350 degrees F.
Step 7 Lower the bread-crumbed eggs into the oil two at a time. Fry for 6 to 8 minutes until they are golden brown and crisp. Remove from the oil with a slotted metal spoon and lay on paper towels to allow excess oil to drain.
Step 8 Serve hot or cold with mustard or dipping sauce of choice.

Hope you all enjoy this taste of the British Isles.

Slán agus beannacht leat!

(Goodbye and blessings)

 

 

Irish American Mom

Other Posts You May Enjoy:

Comments

  1. Hi Mairead, I never heard of this one before. I guess if my cousins didn’t make them I would not have known about scotch eggs, I remember in college I had scotch and eggs but I think that was a different thing, and not as responsible.
    Cheers,
    Brian.

  2. Anything wrapped in sausage (or bacon!) has got to be good :) Hope you’re having a great week, Mairead!

  3. I just bought some ground pork from our farmer specifically for this recipe. I’m really excited to try it! Do you think the meat/bread crumb layer is thick (sturdy) enough to be turned in oil instead of submerged? When we fry things, it’s usually pan fried in coconut oil. I’m just wondering if it would be possible for me to use that method, or if submerging would be the best. Thanks!

    • Aimee – Submerging is a sure way of cooking the pork through. I think the meat and bread crumb layers are sturdy enough for pan frying, but the shape of the eggs will make it difficult to ensure the meat at the oval ends of the eggs is cooked through. If you diligently turn and balance them you might be able to do it. Good luck and let me know how they turn out.

  4. Yummy! Even with my Irish parents, I never heard of these. I’ll have to ask them.

  5. I LOVE SCOTCH EGGS.
    I USE “JIMMY DEANS SAGE SAUSAGE” THEN ADD SOME OF THE OTHER SPICES.

  6. Hi Mairead–Just wanted to say thanks for the most excellent Scotch eggs recipe. One of my passions is cooking, another passion is Ireland. After Googling Irish recipes I found your recipe for Scotch eggs on the irishabroad.com website and took them to a party last night. Well, they were the biggest hit. No one had ever had them before, including me. This will be a dish I will be sharing all the time.
    By the way, you’ve got a pretty nifty website, too.

  7. Meaghan Bailey says:

    Mairead,
    I made these for my boys a short time ago with slightly different directions and they loved them! They are 5 and 2 and could not get enough of them. I will be using this recipe next time and can not wait!!
    Meaghan

    • Meaghan – I am so happy to hear your little boys enjoy Scotch eggs. They really are tasty. My boys won’t eat the eggs, but my little girl loves them. I hope my version turns out as good or better, than the last ones you made.
      All the best,
      Mairéad

  8. Marie Hall says:

    I’ve made Scotch Eggs for years, my family loves them. I do use the bulk Jimmy Dean sausage with the spices already in. I also make a celery sauce and add a dollop over each egg just before serving.
    Thanks, Mairead , for all your great recipes.

    • Marie – Your celery sauce sounds perfect for serving with Scotch Eggs. My husband and I love them. My little girl does too, but I’m afraid my boys won’t even try them. They don’t know what they are missing.
      Best wishes,
      Mairéad

  9. Kim Di Maggio says:

    Dear Mairead,

    Thank you for posting your wonderful Brown Bread recipe. Oh, we surely love it. So very tasty and soft yet good for you. I will be baking more soon. God bless you.

    Kim

  10. I love scotch eggs!! I’ve actually baked them in the oven several times and they’ve always turned out good. Never as awesome as deep fried, but good!

  11. Mike Jemison says:

    Brilliant recipe – thank you!
    (little back ground info on this great delight) Scotch eggs are in fact English. Invented in London in the 18th century as a snack for toffs facing long journeys by carriage from the city back to their country manors. They’d buy a scotch egg, wrap it in their hankie and put it in their pocket for later!

    • Mike – So glad you liked this recipe and thanks so much for adding this wonderful nugget of information about the origins of the Scotch egg. I always love to learn little tidbits from the past.
      Best wishes and thanks so much for stopping by.
      Mairéad

Speak Your Mind

*