Potato Bread – Yeast Recipe

Potato bread made with yeast, flour and mashed potato is a hearty bread, perfect for serving with soups and stews.  Here’s my version of these rustic loaves.

Potato Bread

Ingredients:

The ingredients for this Irish bread are simple. The key to successful potato bread is time and patience to allow the yeast dough plenty of time to rise.

Ingredients for Potato Bread

  • 1 and 1/2 cup mashed potatoes (2 – 3 medium)
  • 1/2 cup reserved potato cooking water
  • 2 packets active dry yeast (1/4 ounce each)
  • 1/2 cup warm water (110° to 115°to dissolve yeast)
  • 1 cup warm milk (110° to 115°)
  • 2 tablespoons butter (melted)
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 6 to 7 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 tablespoons butter or oil (to grease the mixing bowl for the bread to rise in)

 

Directions:

Boiling Potatoes for Potato Bread

The first step is to boil and mash the potatoes. If you have left over mashed potato feel free to use it. However, I don’t recommend using mashed potatoes laden with butter and cream. The extra fat in the potatoes upsets the balance of ingredients in this bread recipe.

So first, peel and cube the potatoes, and cover them with water in a small saucepan. Bring them to a boil, turn the heat down, cover and simmer them for 15 to 20 minutes until tender.

Reserved Potato Water For Bread

Strain the potatoes over an oven-proof bowl or jug. A little of this liquid is great in the bread, but if you are using older mashed potatoes, and don’t have any reserved potato liquid, just replace it with an additional half cup of warm water.

Mashing potato

Mash the potatoes.

Pressing potato through a sieve

It’s important to make sure there are no lumps in the potatoes, so I like to press them through a strainer. A food mill works great, but I’ll have to wait until Christmas for one of those.  As you can see from the photo the strainer works just fine.

Set the potatoes aside to start preparing the yeast and dough.

Yeast in warm water

Add a half cup of warm water to the mixing bowl of an electric mixer. The water should be between 110° to 115° F. Sprinkle the contents of two yeast packets over the water. Let it rest for about 10 minutes. The yeast is ready when it starts to bubble and grow foamy.

Sifting Flour

While the yeast is working its magic, sift all of the flour into a large bowl.

Reserved Potato Water in Potato Yeast Bread

Once the yeast is bubbly add all of the wet ingredient. First add the warm milk and a half cup of reserved potato cooking water.

Adding sugar to yeast mixture

Add the sugar and salt.

Adding softened butter to potato bread

Toss in the softened butter.

Adding flour to yeast dough for potato bread

Add about 4 cups of the sifted flour (a little over half of all the flour).

Mashed potatoes in potato bread

And whatever you do, don’t forget the mashed potatoes. Just toss them in on top of the warm liquids and flour.

Kneading dough in mixer

Knead with a dough hook of an electric mixer.

Adding flour to dough for potato bread

Gradually add an additional 2 to 3 cups of flour to form a stiff dough. Knead it in the mixer until the dough is smooth and glossy, which takes about 8 minutes of constant kneading.

If you don’t have a mixer with a specialty dough hook, you can add the flour by kneading it into the dough on a clean, floured work surface. Great work for building those arm muscles.

Potato Bread Dough Resting

Grease a large bowl with oil or melted butter. Place the kneaded dough in the bowl and turn it over to oil up all the surfaces of the dough.

Covered Dough Bowl

Cover the bowl with plastic wrap or a clean dish towel. Set in a warm, draft-free space and let the dough rise and double in size (about 1 hour).

I like to put the bowl in my cold oven. I find it is the best way to control cold air drafts, especially when the air conditioning is blowing in the summer.

Risen potato bread dough

See how much the dough rises.

Punching bread dough down

Punch the dough down. My little girl loves to watch the dough deflate.

Shaping bread loaves

Turn the dough onto a lightly floured surface. Divide it into two equal halves. Take each section,and knead it lightly to shape it into a loaf.

Dough resting in bread pans

Place each dough section into two greased loaf pans (9 inch x 5 inch). When I make this bread I always make two loaves. All the waiting and kneading seems wasted on just one loaf.

Covered loaf pans

Cover again and let the dough rise for an additional 30 minutes until doubled in size.

While the dough is rising for the final time, preheat the oven to 375 degrees F.

Risen potato bread dough in loaf pans

It’s amazing to see how much the dough expands over time. Lightly dust the top of the loaves with flour if you like a rustic looking crust.

Baked Potato Bread Loaves

Bake the loaves for 20 minutes. Reduce the heat to 350 degrees F and bake for a further 20 to 25 minutes until golden brown. The loaves are cooked if the base sounds hollow when tapped.

I dusted the loaf on the left with extra flour for a rustic crust.

Potato Bread Cooling On Wire Rack

Remove the loaves from the pans and cool them on a wire rack.

This bread is delicious when served fresh. It freezes well for up to two months.

Sliced Potato Bread

This is a great bread to accompany soups and stews, or for rustic sandwiches with thick slices of hearty bread.

Hope you enjoy this bread as much as my family does.

Here is the printable recipe:

Potato Bread – Yeast Recipe

Ingredients

  • 1 and 1/2 cup mashed potatoes (2 - 3 medium)
  • 1/2 cup reserved potato cooking water
  • 2 packets active dry yeast (1/4 ounce each)
  • 1/2 cup warm water (110° to 115°to dissolve yeast)
  • 1 cup warm milk (110° to 115°)
  • 2 tablespoons butter (melted)
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 6 to 7 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 tablespoons butter or oil (to grease the mixing bowl for bread to rise in)

Directions

Step 1 Peel and cube the potatoes. Place in a small saucepan, cover with water and bring to a boil. Turn the heat down, cover and simmer for 15 to 20 minutes until tender.
Step 2 Drain the potatoes, reserving 1/2 cup of the cooking liquid.
Step 3 Mash the potatoes. Press through a food mill or strainer to remove any lumps. Set the potatoes aside.
Step 4 Empty the yeast packets into a large mixing bowl. Add the warm water and set aside for about 10 minutes until the mixture is foamy.
Step 5 Add the warm mashed potatoes, warm milk, reserved potato cooking water, melted butter, sugar, salt and 4 cups of the flour.
Step 6 Knead with a dough hook of an electric mixer. Gradually add an additional 2 to 3 cups of flour to form a stiff dough. Knead it in the mixer until smooth and glossy, about 8 minutes.
Step 7 Grease a large bowl and transfer the bread dough. Cover with plastic wrap or a clean dish towel. Set in a warm, draft-free space and let the dough rise and double in size (about 1 hour).
Step 8 When risen, punch the dough down. Turn onto a lightly floured surface. Divide into two equal halves.
Step 9 Take each section, knead lightly and shape into a loaf.
Step 10 Place into two greased loaf pans (9 inch x 5 inch). Cover again and let the dough rise for an additional 30 minutes until doubled in size.
Step 11 Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Bake the loaves for 20 minutes. Reduce the heat to 350 degrees F and bake for a further 20 to 25 minutes until golden brown. The loaves are cooked if the base sounds hollow when tapped.
Step 12 Remove from the pans and cool on a wire rack.

 

Slán agus beannacht leat!

(Goodbye and blessings)

 

Irish American Mom

 

 

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Comments

  1. Pat F. says:

    Wow, this looks scrumptious. I can’t wait to try it when the temperatures are cooler with a homemade soup! My Hubs does a great Irish carrot soup! Got th recipe when we were visiting years ago.
    Thanks so much!

    • Pat – Hope you enjoy this bread. One of my readers requested this recipe. It is perfect for soup in the fall. In the summer I love to use it to make sandwiches for picnics.
      Hope you’re enjoying your summer,
      Mairéad

  2. Aimee says:

    Yum! Hopefully not too off topic, but I was wondering about your opinion on the ‘Irish’ butter, as it’s called in our house. Years ago when we first started using it, it was deep yellow. It now seems very pale- what’s your take on this? We also sometimes get a butter from Finland, or make it ourselves, and it’s always that nice deep yellow color. I’d love to continue buying the Irish butter, but I know that the deeper yellow means more nutrients and just plain richer in content. Anyway, thanks for another wonderful recipe to try out!

    • Aimee – I have noticed that recently too. Irish butter in Ireland is a far deeper shade of yellow than the butter being sold in America as Irish. I have really noticed that recently. I wonder if there is a lower fat content in butter exported for the American market. I still do use it in preference to American butter, but perhaps I should switch to Finish butter too.
      Take care,
      Mairéad

      • Aimee says:

        That’s sad for us! I wonder if I called if they’d tell me a straight story…And I apologize- the butter we get is not from Finland, but Iceland. I should have gotten up to check before I typed anything, but I didn’t. Sorry!

  3. Mary Miner says:

    Dear Mairead,
    For months I have been following your blog,I find it quite interesting and quite beautiful.My family started out in Ireland many years ago.I just got back from Dun Laoghaire the 7th of April,2014.My husband and I spent a week there,it was the second time there,we had a wonderful time.The flowers and the people were beautiful.Never have we gone to a country that we completely feel at home.
    This morning looking through your blog,I decided to make potatoe bread,it came out beautiful,tonight I am having it with carrot soup.Sincere thanks, Mary

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