Curried Parsnip Crisps

Curried parsnip crisps are a perfect garnish for soup, a healthier alternative to store bought crisps or chips, or a simple tasty snack. 

Baked in the oven, these crispy vegetable wafers can be seasoned and spiced up whatever way you choose.

Parsnip chips as a soup garnish

I love to add these flavorful parsnip shavings to the top of parsnip and apple soup -they’re a simple, elegant garnish. They’re also great to pass around as nibblers with soup.

Parsnip crisps is what I like to call these tasty morsels, but I suppose in America they might be called parsnip chips. However, these shavings are thin and crispy, not thick and chunky like an Irish chip, so the name parsnip crisps describes them perfectly.

And you won’t believe how easy they are to make.

 

Ingredients:

  • 1 parsnip
  • 1 tablespoon of vegetable or olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon of curry powder

 

Shaved parsnip for parsnip chips

Pre-heat the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit.

Peel the parsnip, and discard the skins, so you won’t get them mixed up with the parsnip shavings.

Using the vegetable peeler, scrape thin wafers down the length of the parsnip. Don’t worry if they split halfway down.

Keep turning and shaving the parsnip until you reach the woody core at the center. Throw this away, since it produces coarser, less tasty crisps. (If, like me, you go by the motto waste not want not, you can always toss the parsnip core into the pot when you’re making stock).

Oil and curry powder for parsnip chips

Next, pour the oil into a bowl and mix in the curry powder. I love the flavor of curry with parsnips. Season the oil with salt and pepper if desired. I find these crisps are just fine without any added sodium when spiced up with curry powder.

Chili and Mexican spices work well too. Feel free to experiment with your favorites.

Tossing shaved parsnip in oil and curry powder

 Next, toss the parsnip shavings in the seasoned oil to coat them fully.

Parsnip chips on baking tray

Parsnip crisps can be deep fried in oil, but I prefer to bake mine in a hot oven.

Lay the parsnip shavings in a single layer on a baking tray.

Pop them in the oven for about 5 minutes. Turn them at this point, and then pop them back in for another 5 to 10 minutes. 

These crisps are very thin, so they can burn easily. Since temperatures vary from oven to oven, watch them closely so they do not burn.

Parsnip chips on paper towel

Remove them from the oven and lay them on some paper towels to remove any excess oil.

Once they cool a little they’re ready to eat.

I just can’t help sneaking a few before they ever adorn a soup bowl.

These little snacks are simply delicious, and my kids love them.

Parsnip, apple and curry soup in a shamrock bowl

I hope you enjoy this recipe for a simple vegetable garnish to dress up soups.

Here’s the printable recipe:

Parsnip Crisps

Serves 4
Prep time 10 minutes
Cook time 15 minutes
Total time 25 minutes
Meal type Snack
Parsnip crisps are a healthier alternative to store bought crisps or chips, and are a simple tasty snack. They can even be used to garnish soups and salads.

Ingredients

  • 1 Medium parsnip
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable or olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon curry powder

Directions

Step 1 Pre-heat the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit.
Step 2 Peel the parsnip and discard the skins. Using a vegetable peeler, scrape thin wafers down the length of the parsnip. Keep shaving the parsnip until you reach the woody core. Throw this away.
Step 3 Pour the oil into a bowl and mix in the curry powder. Toss the parsnip shavings in the seasoned oil to coat them fully.
Step 4 Spread the parsnip shavings in a single layer on a baking tray.
Step 5 Bake in the 400 degree F. oven for 5 minutes. Turn them at this point, and return them to the oven for another 5 to 10 minutes. Check the parsnip crisps frequently, since they can burn easily.
Step 6 Transfer the cooked crisps to a layer of paper towels to cool.
Step 7 Serve as a snack, or use to garnish soups and salads.

Happy snacking.

 

Slán agus beannacht leat!

(Goodbye and blessings)

 

Irish American Mom

Parsnip and Apple Soup

Parsnips and apples, with a hint of curry, compliment each other perfectly in this creamy soup.

The pairing of parsnips with apples intensifies their sweetness, with an added underlying warmth from the curry powder, making this soup truly satisfying.

I love curry flavor, like many Irish people.  A teaspoon of mild curry powder, a hint of ginger and black pepper create a mildly spicy flavor level, but rest assured, this isn’t an overly hot soup, merely one that tantalizes the taste buds.

Parsnip and apple soup with curried parsnip chips

Heavy rain and blustery winds are always a reminder the season for hats, scarves and gloves is just around the corner. But as the colder days of winter beckon, there’s always comfort to be found in the kitchen.

The right soup is perfect comfort food. There is something reassuring about holding a mug of warm soup, blowing gently to cool it before it works its magic, warming the heart.

Parsnip and apple soup is smooth and creamy, and for me is certainly one of the best comforting soups in my recipe box.

Parsnips appear to be far less popular in America than they are in Ireland. They are a staple on most Irish dinner menus, and I remember eating them at least once a week when I was a kid in Ireland.

And so, I decided why not make a parsnip soup…. or for some crazy reason, my brain keeps saying parsnip snoup.

Anyway, here’s my recipe …..

Ingredients for parsnip and apple soup

Ingredients:

 

  • 2 oz butter
  • 3 large parsnips
  • 1 medium apple (Granny Smith or a cooking apple if you’re in Ireland)
  • 1 medium potato (or 2 small potatoes)
  • 1 to 2 teaspoons curry powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 4 cups chicken stock
  • 1/2 cup whipping cream
  • salt and plenty pepper to season

 

Directions:

 

This is a very simple soup. Start by peeling and chopping the shallots into slices. Peel and dice the potatoes and parsnips into 1 inch pieces.

Sweating vegetables - parsnips, shallots and potato

The first step involves sweating the vegetables. If you need to learn more about the technique of sweating vegetables, check out my post on soup making tips.

Melt the butter in a large saucepan. Add the chopped shallots, parsnips and potato.

I use shallots rather than an onion, since their flavor is a little milder, but if you can’t get your hands on shallots, one onion will work just fine.

For this soup in particular I like to add the spices before sweating the vegetables. This helps deepen the spicy flavors in the finished soup.

So, stir in the curry powder and ginger and mix the vegetables so they are completely coated in the spices.

Cover the pan and sweat the vegetables over medium heat for 10 minutes. Shake the pan occasionally to prevent sticking, but avoid lifting the lid and allowing the trapped steam escape.

Adding broth to parsnip soup

Add the stock and simmer for 20 minutes. Season with salt and pepper.

I like to add a good dash of pepper to this soup, but seasoning is a very personal step in any recipe. For my palate, pepper seems to compliment the flavor of the parsnips.

Adding chopped apple to parsnip soup

Next, add the chopped apple and simmer the soup for a further 10 minutes.

Parsnip soup prior to blending

Turn off the heat and allow the soup to cool slightly.

I love how the apple pieces just bob and bounce on the surface of the soup.

Adding cream to parsnip and apple soup

Purée the soup until the texture is completely smooth using an immersion blender or in batches using a liquidizer or blender.

Add the cream to the soup and mix through. Reheat gently, without boiling, before serving.

Parsnip, apple and curry soup in a shamrock bowl

And there, you have it – a simple soup made with a favorite Irish vegetable. I love to serve this soup with curried parsnip chips as a garnish – they’re simply delicious.

Here’s my printable recipe:

Parsnip and Apple Soup

Serves 6
Prep time 20 minutes
Cook time 50 minutes
Total time 1 hours, 10 minutes
Meal type Soup
Parsnips and apples, with a hint of curry, compliment each other perfectly in this creamy soup. The pairing of parsnips with apples intensifies their sweetness, with an added underlying warmth from the curry powder, making this soup truly satisfying.

Ingredients

  • 2oz butter
  • 2 shallots
  • 3 parsnips
  • 1 apple (Granny Smith or a cooking apple)
  • 1 potato (1 medium or 2 small)
  • 1 teaspoon curry powder (add extra for increased spiciness)
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 4 cups chicken stock
  • 1/2 cup whipping cream
  • salt and pepper to season

Directions

Step 1 Melt the butter in a large saucepan. Add the chopped shallots, parsnips and potato.
Step 2 Stir in the curry powder and ground ginger. Cover the pan and sweat the vegetables over medium heat for 10 minutes. Shake the pan occasionally to prevent sticking, but avoid lifting the lid and allowing the trapped steam escape.
Step 3 Add the stock and simmer for 20 minutes. Season with salt and pepper.
Step 4 Add the chopped apple and simmer for a further 10 minutes.
Step 5 Turn off the heat and allow the soup to cool slightly. Purée until smooth using an immersion blender or in batches using a liquidizer or blender.
Step 6 Add the cream to the soup and mix through. Reheat gently, without boiling, before serving.

Wishing you all happy soup making during these chilly days of fall and winter.

 

Slán agus beannacht leat!

(Goodbye and blessings)

 

Irish American Mom

 

P.S. My Irish shamrock soup bowl was made by Colm De Ris, an Irish potter.

The Irish American Influence – Guest Post By Brighid O’Sullivan

Brighid O’Sullivan grew up hearing Irish folk tales from her father in Western Massachusetts. She’s been writing short stories since she was a child and as an adult has written for History Magazine, History Channel magazine, and her local paper. She works full time as a nurse and has just published her debut novel, The Sun Palace, a story of history and magic set in 6th Century Ireland.

In today’s guest post, Brighid introduces us to the Irish American influences that have inspired her writing. 

 

The Sun Palace By Brighid O’Sullivan:

 

In 2007, I began writing my first novel, The Sun Palace. I knew nothing about Ireland or her history, had not known my great grandparents who emigrated to America, nor had I ever been to Ireland. What I did know about being Irish was given to me by my father, though that knowledge consisted of a few Irish folktales, playing records (yes, records!) made by Irish musicians, leprechauns my dad swore were like his guardian angels (an American view actually), rides on a St. Patrick’s day float in Holyoke Massachusetts, and lots of “blarney”. My dad was full of stories, most of which I did not believe.

Parade Happy

So why did I set my novel, The Sun Palace, in Ireland?

I started to read more than ever, which soon led me into European and Irish history, as well as novels written by Anne Rice, Morgan Llywelyn, Sebastian Barry, and Diana Gabaldon. I have a passion for anything historical and I love books. I collect and read all sorts of history, European as well as American, beginning and ending with Ireland, a place I grew to respect and love.

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Writing fiction is a laborious activity but writing historical fiction is even more so. There are all those research books one must read, buy, borrow, steal, and find!

I knew that, and like I said, I love history, but imagine trying to remember all those stories by heart like the druids did, or worse, what if books were actually forbidden? Lots of things were forbidden in the beginning of Ireland’s conquest by the English. To name a few, having an Irish name, Irish dress, and Irish trade, and we all know how the divisions of religion came to be.

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I read somewhere, there are more Irish in America than in all of Ireland! According to several statistics, 89,000 Irish emigrated from Ireland in 2013 but 55,000, many of them European, immigrated to Ireland! I believe that, because I’ve since been to Ireland twice and upon landing in Dublin for the first time, found myself saying, “so where are all the Irish?”

In one of my blog posts on my website Celtic Thoughts I talk about how if there was no Ireland there would be no America. For every accomplishment, from the beginning of America’s independence, to putting a man on the moon, Irish men and women have been part of the equation.

The fact that I am a writer goes back as far as the original bards in Celtic Ireland. ‘Tis in my blood and who I am. Blood that was shed for Ireland and America both … blood lost in wars, famines, mass emigration, prejudice and even death. I cannot help but feel grateful for such a sacrifice.

The Sun Palace

Oh and my idea for The Sun Palace? That grew from the kernel of a thought, after reading Tristan and Isolde, an Irish love story.

Check it out on Amazon and if you are generous enough to leave an honest review on the Amazon website, drop me an email about it @celticbrighid@gmail.com. I welcome all positive as well as constructive criticisms. As a much appreciated thank you, I will make sure you get my next published novel FREE.

My name is Brighid O’Sullivan and you can find me on Twitter, Pinterest, and on my website Celtic Thoughts writing about Irish and Irish American history.

 

Thanks so much, Brighid, for introducing us to your writing and your inspirations. Wishing you every success with The Sun Palace, and all of your future writing endeavors.

 

Slán agus beannacht leat!

(Goodbye and blessings)

 

Irish American Mom

 

 

Between The Jigs And The Reels

My West Cork granny frequently referred to jigs and reels in her daily speech. Whenever she was a little flustered, in a hurry, or feeling chaotic, she would make an exclamation about Irish dancing, no less.

“Between the jigs and the reels, I don’t know whether I’m coming or going.”

 

Any stranger would believe she was an Irish step dancing champion with her constant referral to the two most popular of all Irish dances.

“Between the jigs and the reels, what are we up to now?”

 

But as far as I know, she was no River Dancer, although I suppose in her youth she rattled a few dance boards at the crossroads.

Irish Dance - Between the Jigs and the Reels

Her referral to jigs and reels was typically Irish – an idiom used to express perceived stress and difficulties. Perhaps this statement evolved as a reflection of the chaotic foot movement of Irish dancing.

 

“Between the jigs and the reels, I finally got it done.”

 

In this instance the saying reflects success was achieved, despite all the confusion.

 

“I don’t know how we did it, but between the jigs and the reels,

we’re finally ready to go.”

 

The primary way my granny used this expression was to say “what with one thing and another”.

 

“So, between the jigs and the reels, poor Mikey lost the cow.”

 

The jigs and the reels often expressed the trials and tribulations of farming life.

Irish Harp - Between the jigs and the reels.

At other times she used the phrase to express her determination, the words taking on a hopeful meaning of “somehow or another.”

 

“I’ll get that money together, between the jigs and the reels.”

 

As you can see, the jigs and the reels were frequently invoked during my childhood.

I was wondering if any of you remember your Irish relatives using this expression. Perhaps they paired it with another typically Irish exclamation. Please feel free to join in this little Irish dancing discussion, in the comments section below.

And so, between the jigs and the reels of life as mom, it’s time for me to sign off for today.

 

Slán agus beannacht leat!

(Goodbye and blessings)

Irish American Mom

Five Irish Craft Makers To Watch Plus A $100 Shopping Spree Giveaway From USofIreland

In Ireland something of a mini revolution is taking place. The creative and design industry is beginning to find a growing audience of buyers looking for something different outside of the obvious.

Being Irish means something, especially to anyone who has a cultural connection to Ireland. It’s a sense of ancestry and home, even if you have never visited the country – you can still feel it.

140930-blog-feat

So it’s understandable that this is reflected in the types of Irish products that sell the most. However, there is also a different Ireland.  The influence our creativity has had on popular culture cannot be diminished.

  • Think of writers like Oscar Wilde, George Bernard Shaw, James Joyce, Brendan Behan & Frank McCourt;
  • Musicians like Luke Kelly, Van Morrison, Christy Moore & Phil Lynott;
  • Actors like Maureen O’Hara, Liam Neeson, Pierce Brosnan, Daniel Day-Lewis & Richard Harris.

All of these people, and so many more were, and are, blessed with creativity.

From the ancient etchings of the Ogham language to intricate modern carvings of wood furniture – creativity is unmistakably an Irish trait. It’s in our blood.

UsofIreland

 

Introducing USofIreland:

 

USofIreland is a website that brings together independent makers across the island of Ireland under one roof, and offers these makers and artists a platform to showcase and sell their products to a wider audience outside of Ireland.

Their aim as makers living and working in Ireland today, is to show our cousins around the world that we more than hold our own in the creativity stakes. Don’t rule us out!

We have picked out 5 makers on our website we believe are very much ‘Ones To Watch’.

Whilst it does feel slightly like choosing a favorite child, every maker on the website has their own story to tell. Here are just 5 we picked:

 

John Nolan

 

Preoccupied with color, John Nolan is an artist based in Dublin. His exuberant style combines bold outlines with bright exotic shades. His interpretation of various motifs transmits a positive upbeat feeling to his viewers. His motifs include Fish, Flowers, People, Birds, Still Life, Abstract, Collage & Landscapes.

By John Nolan

By John Nolan

Tracy Gilbert

 

Tracy is immensely proud of being Irish and is fluent in her native Irish language. Her aim is to intertwine this pride with imagination to create beautiful jewelry designs that reflect Ireland artistic and mythological heritage. Clever design, quality materials and craftsmanship are the cornerstones of Tracy’s creations.

By Tracy Gilbert

By Tracy Gilbert

Siobhain Steele

 

Siobhain designs and makes a range of ceramic vases, bottles and giftware, which are carefully hand decorated to evoke a sense of simplicity and serenity. Inspired by the abstract line and patterns found in the lush natural landscape surrounding her studio in Rathcormac, Co Cork.

3-siobhain-steele

By Siobhain Steele

Conor Lynch

 

Teenager Conor Lynch is a woodturner based in rural Co Offaly. He started woodturning at the age of eleven after seeing a demonstration. After turning twelve, he bought a lathe with his confirmation money. Largely self-taught, he is now considered one of Irelands emerging makers working in turned wood.

By Conor Lynch

By Conor Lynch

Scribble & Stone

 

Scribble & Stone is a contemporary and unique Irish fashion label based in Dublin. The “Scribble” in the title refers to their love of illustration and to the quirky graphics and scribbles across tags and packaging. The “stone” refers to gemstones which are an important component in many of their pieces. This combination creates truly unique fusion jewelry pieces.

By Scribble Stone

By Scribble Stone

 

The Giveaway:

 

James Galvin, the Chairman and Co-Founder of USofIreland, has generously donated a $100 shopping spree on their wonderful website, for one of Irish American Mom’s readers.  And so, in essence you can pick your own prize. The winner will be free to spend $100 on the item or items of their choosing from the vast array of unique and beautiful works of art available from USofIreland.

To enter our giveaway just click here. The terms and conditions are outline on the entry form

The competition is open until midnight October 31st, 2014. 

A winner will be chosen randomly and notified by e-mail.

Best of luck to all our entrants and a big thank you to USofIreland for sponsoring this fantastic prize for Irish American Mom’s readers.

 

Slán agus beannacht leat!

(Goodbye and blessings)

 

Irish American Mom

 

Disclosure of Material Connection: Irish American Mom does not have any business relationship with USofIreland and did not receive cash payment for publishing this guest post.  The purpose of this giveaway is to help spread the word about Irish artists. Thank you to all who support Irish and Irish American crafts people and their wonderful enterprises.