Zucchini And Leek Soup

Zucchini and leeks combine to make a wonderfully green soup. Light and refreshing, this soup can be served hot or cold, but being ever so Irish, I like it hot.

Inspired by the more traditional Irish recipe for potato and leek soup, I love to make this soup when I have lots of zucchini on hand. Or perhaps I should give this soup its European name, courgette and leek soup.

Zucchini or courgette and leek soup

I remember when I first came to America, I had no idea what on earth a zucchini might be. I remember searching for courgettes in the grocery store only to spot them under the strangely named sign “zucchini”.

And then I checked a little closer and discovered that what I called an aubergine bore the strange title of “egg plant” in the good old USA.

My ongoing American evolution continued at the grocery store with never ending culinary lessons and naming tips.

At the end of every summer I often hear my green thumbed neighbors searching for zucchini recipes, when they are blessed with an abundant crop of these nutritious and easy-to-grow vegetables.  This soup is my answer to their recipe pleas.

And so without further ado, here is my recipe for zucchini and leek, or courgette and leek soup.

Remember, it’s green coloring makes it perfect for St. Patrick’s Day celebrations.

Ingredients for zucchini and leek soup

Ingredients

4 medium zucchini (washed and sliced)
1 large leek or 2 small leeks (washed and sliced)
2 oz butter
1 carrot (peeled and sliced)
1 potato (peeled and sliced)
6 cups chicken stock
salt and pepper to season
1/4 cup whipping cream
parsley (to garnish if desired)

 Washing Leeks

Directions:

Prepare the vegetables carefully. Leeks can contain dirt trapped between the inner layers of the vegetables, so it’s very important to wash them well. If you need some tips on how to wash and prepare leeks check out my recipe for potato and leek soup.

Sliced courgettes or zucchini, potato and carrot for soup
Wash the zucchini, then slice them skin and all. I find the outer skin adds flavor to this soup.  Peel and slice the carrot and potato.
Melting butter in a dutch oven for soup

Melt the butter over medium heat in a large Dutch oven or pan.

Add the sliced vegetables and stir to completely cover them in butter. This coating of butter is important for sweating the vegetables and helping them to not stick to the bottom of the pan.

Sliced zucchini, leeks, potato and carrot for soup

Cover the pot and cook over medium heat for 10 minutes to sweat the vegetables.

Shake the pot occasionally to prevent the vegetables from sticking. It’s important not to brown the vegetables, but merely to soften them in the steamy pot.

Adding stock to zucchini and leek soup
Add the chicken stock and season with salt and pepper to taste. You can use vegetable stock for this soup too if you prefer vegetarian recipes. I like the taste of chicken stock with the leeks, but the choice of stock is completely personal.

Bring the soup to a boil, then reduce the heat and simmer the soup for 20 minutes.  Remember, gentle heat is very important for cooking soups.

Tender vegetables in stock before pureeing soup

When simmered enough, the vegetables will be fork tender. The trick to a nicely textured soup is to cook the zucchini and the leeks long enough to make them nice and soft before whizzing them with the blender.

Puréeing soup with an immersion blender
Turn off the heat and allow the soup to cool slightly before blending it until smooth. An immersion blender works great, or else blend it in batches in a liquidizer.

Adding whipping cream to soup purée

Add the cream and stir well to blend completely. Reheat over a gentle heat without boiling.

Pot of zucchini and leek soup

Serve this soup warm or cold, and garnish with parsley if desired.

Zucchini and leek soup with brown bread

Irish brown bread is a tasty accompaniment to this soup. Irish potato bread is another great partner for soup.

But whether you like your soup all on its lonesome, or with a nice slice of bread, I hope you enjoy this zucchini and leek soup as much as I do.

Here’s the printable recipe:

Zucchini And Leek Soup

Serves 8
Prep time 20 minutes
Cook time 30 minutes
Total time 50 minutes
Meal type Soup

Ingredients

  • 4 Medium zucchini (washed and sliced)
  • 1 Large leek (washed and sliced)
  • 2oz butter
  • 1 carrot (peeled and sliced)
  • 1 potato (peeled and sliced)
  • 6 cups chicken stock
  • salt and pepper to season
  • 1/4 cup whipping cream

Optional

  • parsley (to garnish)

Directions

Step 1 Melt the butter over medium heat in a large Dutch oven or pan. Add the sliced vegetables and stir to completely cover in butter.
Step 2 Cover the pot and cook over medium heat for 10 minutes to sweat the vegetables. Shake the pot occasionally to prevent the vegetables from sticking. Do not brown the vegetables.
Step 3 Add the chicken stock and season with salt and pepper to taste.
Step 4 Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat and simmer the soup for 20 minutes. The vegetables will be fork tender.
Step 5 Turn off the heat and allow the soup to cool slightly before blending it until smooth.
Step 6 Add the cream and stir well to blend completely. Reheat over a gentle heat without boiling.
Step 7 Garnish with parsley, if desired, before serving.

Slán agus beannacht leat!

(Goodbye and blessings)

 

Irish American Mom

Irish Halloween Superstitions Foretelling Romance, Love And Marriage

Move over Valentine’s Day – Halloween is nearly here, and in olden days in Ireland, this was the time of year for predicting romances, just waiting to flourish.

The Irish were, and still are, a very superstitious race. Since we will be celebrating Halloween at the end of this month (or all through this month, if you live in America), I thought why not explore some old Irish superstitions associated with this holiday, especially those centering around romance, love and marriage.

Vintage_Halloween_Cards_(102)Image Credit

Halloween is a great time for fortune telling and divination according to Irish tradition.  In days gone by Halloween night was a time when the Irish believed the future and past coincided, and for one night only every year, all time frames existed in the present. If the future collides with the present at Halloween, what better time could there be for looking into what the future may hold.

For all those in search of someone special to share their future, Halloween is the best night of the year to try to figure out who might be waiting just for you. Well that’s what the Irish believed anyway.

Here are some simple, romantic, prophetic tests from Ireland’s Celtic past and from around the British Isles…..

 www.vintagerio.comImage Credit

The Cabbage Test:

 

For those interested in finding out their future partner’s wealth then all you need is a good old cabbage patch on this magical night.

Just follow these steps to find out what the future holds …..

  • Don a blindfold.
  • Run into a field of growing cabbages.
  • Search around the ground for a nice big head of cabbage, and yank it out of the ground, roots and all.
  • Now, uncover your eyes, and check out those cabbage roots.
  • If you extricate the vegetable with roots intact and a good amount of earth still attached, then your beloved will have oodles of money.

But don’t get too excited. You still don’t know if he’ll be cranky or kind.

Head on home with your newly harvested cabbage and cook it up Irish style.

If your cabbage is bitter, then I’m afraid a sour, old, so-and-so may be in your future. But if your cabbage is sweet, then your fate holds a kindhearted, loving mate.

The cabbage test was easy to complete if you lived in rural Ireland many years ago, but I’m afraid we urban dwellers today have little access to cabbage patches. So then, your best bet for predicting love is to move on to the bonfire test.

 https://www.flickr.com/photos/leeco/15179907931/in/photolist-p8oZLx-oN589j-p7Bq7D-pxA3CT-oteYxQ-orP56S-p3FEkb-pttggM-ooTouY-oxePA4-p7Ctn5-ovDoy6-oL2mH8-ow3M9c-paC6hf-pxyh5y-oyrCAy-oZPRvZ-p6GcDi-oNZzWs-oT7wgY-pe637U-phsU6w-ocFCuv-oDopTW-pxo3De-p8zfsw-oT7oon-ovCTQf-oF9xRk-oT7pUt-oT7X1Y-pam4tr-oK8AU7-oo7umd-opQ46b-ow5T3C-pazDEN-oT8iM4-pakNXH-oMxTqF-oT88kq-p8zFRC-pntk1S-ouWLGr-obsWxu-oT67fm-pEr7y1-opRrac-puqmd7Image Credit

The Bonfire Test:

 

A Halloween bonfire is touted as a way to help envision a future partner. Bonfires featured significantly in ancient, Celtic celebrations of Halloween or Samhain. Here’s what must be done to encourage dreams of your future love.

Simply snip a few strands of your hair, and drop them into the burning embers of a Halloween fire.

The magical flames of your burning hair will encourage vivid dreams of your future spouse. I hope he or she will fulfill all your dreams.

 https://www.flickr.com/photos/robbertholf/15241805765/in/photolist-pdSeQz-7zJTpB-7WhtNb-9C3Ybd-awf8T-kctbSc-e7GxYf-46NPSw-hEDBo9-5Yxqfi-bVhTNf-5wyfbU-ifg23C-p2fS3-5YBD8d-cvWvoL-dsYusi-65gpn7-6L6Hfj-8KrFjx-7zJSAB-8MaNFp-5F2f1N-fyDVNk-9cYfci-fr3U4A-kctgMx-4J6XP-9wtYoo-3eRwDK-8HMU3G-5WCY1r-ygyPR-jf9zuz-bwTm3w-5ddh2J-kJVW2b-7GzyYJ-2YzNc8-5nZHiq-9cZCKS-JMpS1-7AYGc-e9gQQf-CCkaJ-6Z2wEs-oM4XNS-5oifvJ-ih5xo4-h2P7nq/Image Credit

The Apple Peel Test:

 

Apples were also used for telling the future on Halloween night. When I was a little girl in Dublin, most home owners shared apples and nuts with trick or treaters, rather than candy or sweets. In recent years I have come to appreciate how this custom was rooted in age old traditions.

The apple peel love test may have originated in Scotland rather than Ireland, but this trick was practiced throughout the British Isles. A little apple peeling skill is required for this one.

First you must peel an apple all in one go, creating a long strip of peel. Love awaits only for those who can remove the peel with no breakages.

The peel must then be thrown over the shoulder. As it falls the peel may land to reveal the initial of a would-be suitor.

Love is an apple peel – it sounds like the name of a song.

 HazelnutsImage Credit

Hazlenut Trials:

 

If you’re still interested in finding out if your spouse will be bitter or sweet, and don’t have time to go pulling cabbages to cook, then never fear. A hazelnut will reveal your future love’s temperament, just as accurately as a trusted cabbage.

Simply pick out the hazelnut you believe represents your future love. Crack the shell and taste. You’ll quickly learn if a sweet or bitter nut awaits in your future.

And there’s even more romantic news to be uncovered through these powerful nuts.

If you want to know if your future marriage will be full of happiness, then you and your partner must each choose a hazelnut.

Light a match between the two nuts (only do this on a flameproof surface), and watch how your two nuts react, not only to each other, but to the flame of love burning between them.

Remember our forebears had stone hearths for these fiery tricks, so don’t do anything dangerous.

If the nuts burn quickly, then alack and alas, the future marriage may not be strong, and may be at great risk of crumbling when life gets tough.

Now if your two nuts do a little dance and move away from each other, then proceed to marriage with caution.

If your hazelnuts hop closer together, moving towards the flame of love, then future happiness is yours.

Believe it or not, these trusted nuts hold even more secrets of the future. Hazelnuts can be used to choose between potential beaus.

In the past, inquisitive young women determined which admirer might be faithful, by choosing three nuts, and naming them after the young men she wished to test. The three nuts were placed upon the bars of the fire grate.

If a nut cracked or jumped, then that lover might be unfaithful. If the nut burned brightly then that beau held a flame for the girl performing the hazelnut trial.

This test could be taken a step further by adding a fourth nut, named after the girl. If her nut and one of the nuts named after a potential suitor blazed together, then love was assured and marriage inevitable.

Sliced Tea Brack

A Slice Of Brack To Tell Your Fortune:

 

Traditional Irish Halloween celebrations involve serving an Irish cake called brack.  This tradition continues to this day.

These raisin breads are baked with hidden treasures in the dough, usually a coin, a piece of cloth, a key, a ring, a thimble or a button.

  • Lucky Halloween revelers who discover the coin can look forward to a year of prosperity.
  • But I’m afraid your finances look bleak if you find the old piece of cloth.
  • Of course, the ring foretells an impending marriage, or a new romance.
  • But if you find the thimble you’ll be an old maid.
  • A button foretells a year of bachelorhood for a male barmbrack eater.
  • And a key tells the story of an imminent journey.

 

Bowl of porridgeImage Credit

A Bowl of Porridge:

 

Now if you don’t have time to be baking fancy barmbracks with rings and things inside, do not fear. A simple bowl of porridge will do the trick.

Fuarag (pronounced foo-ur-ag) is a traditional dish of oatmeal mixed with cream. If you’re eager to learn if new love is just around the corner for you or one of your friends, just make a big pot of porridge.

Add some cream, a ring and a coin. Dish out the porridge to all those seeking to know if their future holds marriage or wealth. The lucky finder of the ring will be married within the year, while wealth awaits whoever recovers the coin.

And hold your breath if your bowl of creamy gruel reveals both the ring and the coin – a wealthy spouse may soon cross your path.

Remember to eat with caution on Halloween night – all these bits and pieces in traditional foods are a major choking hazard.

Colcannon with melting butter.

Colcannon:

 

Colcannon is a traditional Irish dish served at Halloween. It’s a mix of kale and mashed potatoes, served with melted butter, and once again this simple dish holds the powers of divination.

In the past, unmarried women would take their first and last spoonful of colcannon and put it inside a stocking. These colcannon stockings were hung from the frame of the front door. The first man to enter the house and pass beneath the fortune telling stocking would become their husband.

 

Halloween – A Time For Romance:

 

And there you have it – my romantic guide to Halloween festivities. If you know of any more prophetic Halloween traditions concerning love and marriage, please feel free to add your two cents worth in the comment section below.  I look forward to hearing new superstitions from all over the world.

Wishing you all happy love matches this Halloween.

 

Samhain Shona Daoibh

Happy Halloween

 

Irish American Mom

Curried Parsnip Crisps

Curried parsnip crisps are a perfect garnish for soup, a healthier alternative to store bought crisps or chips, or a simple tasty snack. 

Baked in the oven, these crispy vegetable wafers can be seasoned and spiced up whatever way you choose.

Parsnip chips as a soup garnish

I love to add these flavorful parsnip shavings to the top of parsnip and apple soup -they’re a simple, elegant garnish. They’re also great to pass around as nibblers with soup.

Parsnip crisps is what I like to call these tasty morsels, but I suppose in America they might be called parsnip chips. However, these shavings are thin and crispy, not thick and chunky like an Irish chip, so the name parsnip crisps describes them perfectly.

And you won’t believe how easy they are to make.

 

Ingredients:

  • 1 parsnip
  • 1 tablespoon of vegetable or olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon of curry powder

 

Shaved parsnip for parsnip chips

Pre-heat the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit.

Peel the parsnip, and discard the skins, so you won’t get them mixed up with the parsnip shavings.

Using the vegetable peeler, scrape thin wafers down the length of the parsnip. Don’t worry if they split halfway down.

Keep turning and shaving the parsnip until you reach the woody core at the center. Throw this away, since it produces coarser, less tasty crisps. (If, like me, you go by the motto waste not want not, you can always toss the parsnip core into the pot when you’re making stock).

Oil and curry powder for parsnip chips

Next, pour the oil into a bowl and mix in the curry powder. I love the flavor of curry with parsnips. Season the oil with salt and pepper if desired. I find these crisps are just fine without any added sodium when spiced up with curry powder.

Chili and Mexican spices work well too. Feel free to experiment with your favorites.

Tossing shaved parsnip in oil and curry powder

 Next, toss the parsnip shavings in the seasoned oil to coat them fully.

Parsnip chips on baking tray

Parsnip crisps can be deep fried in oil, but I prefer to bake mine in a hot oven.

Lay the parsnip shavings in a single layer on a baking tray.

Pop them in the oven for about 5 minutes. Turn them at this point, and then pop them back in for another 5 to 10 minutes. 

These crisps are very thin, so they can burn easily. Since temperatures vary from oven to oven, watch them closely so they do not burn.

Parsnip chips on paper towel

Remove them from the oven and lay them on some paper towels to remove any excess oil.

Once they cool a little they’re ready to eat.

I just can’t help sneaking a few before they ever adorn a soup bowl.

These little snacks are simply delicious, and my kids love them.

Parsnip, apple and curry soup in a shamrock bowl

I hope you enjoy this recipe for a simple vegetable garnish to dress up soups.

Here’s the printable recipe:

Parsnip Crisps

Serves 4
Prep time 10 minutes
Cook time 15 minutes
Total time 25 minutes
Meal type Snack
Parsnip crisps are a healthier alternative to store bought crisps or chips, and are a simple tasty snack. They can even be used to garnish soups and salads.

Ingredients

  • 1 Medium parsnip
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable or olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon curry powder

Directions

Step 1 Pre-heat the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit.
Step 2 Peel the parsnip and discard the skins. Using a vegetable peeler, scrape thin wafers down the length of the parsnip. Keep shaving the parsnip until you reach the woody core. Throw this away.
Step 3 Pour the oil into a bowl and mix in the curry powder. Toss the parsnip shavings in the seasoned oil to coat them fully.
Step 4 Spread the parsnip shavings in a single layer on a baking tray.
Step 5 Bake in the 400 degree F. oven for 5 minutes. Turn them at this point, and return them to the oven for another 5 to 10 minutes. Check the parsnip crisps frequently, since they can burn easily.
Step 6 Transfer the cooked crisps to a layer of paper towels to cool.
Step 7 Serve as a snack, or use to garnish soups and salads.

Happy snacking.

 

Slán agus beannacht leat!

(Goodbye and blessings)

 

Irish American Mom

Parsnip and Apple Soup

Parsnips and apples, with a hint of curry, compliment each other perfectly in this creamy soup.

The pairing of parsnips with apples intensifies their sweetness, with an added underlying warmth from the curry powder, making this soup truly satisfying.

I love curry flavor, like many Irish people.  A teaspoon of mild curry powder, a hint of ginger and black pepper create a mildly spicy flavor level, but rest assured, this isn’t an overly hot soup, merely one that tantalizes the taste buds.

Parsnip and apple soup with curried parsnip chips

Heavy rain and blustery winds are always a reminder the season for hats, scarves and gloves is just around the corner. But as the colder days of winter beckon, there’s always comfort to be found in the kitchen.

The right soup is perfect comfort food. There is something reassuring about holding a mug of warm soup, blowing gently to cool it before it works its magic, warming the heart.

Parsnip and apple soup is smooth and creamy, and for me is certainly one of the best comforting soups in my recipe box.

Parsnips appear to be far less popular in America than they are in Ireland. They are a staple on most Irish dinner menus, and I remember eating them at least once a week when I was a kid in Ireland.

And so, I decided why not make a parsnip soup…. or for some crazy reason, my brain keeps saying parsnip snoup.

Anyway, here’s my recipe …..

Ingredients for parsnip and apple soup

Ingredients:

 

  • 2 oz butter
  • 3 large parsnips
  • 1 medium apple (Granny Smith or a cooking apple if you’re in Ireland)
  • 1 medium potato (or 2 small potatoes)
  • 1 to 2 teaspoons curry powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 4 cups chicken stock
  • 1/2 cup whipping cream
  • salt and plenty pepper to season

 

Directions:

 

This is a very simple soup. Start by peeling and chopping the shallots into slices. Peel and dice the potatoes and parsnips into 1 inch pieces.

Sweating vegetables - parsnips, shallots and potato

The first step involves sweating the vegetables. If you need to learn more about the technique of sweating vegetables, check out my post on soup making tips.

Melt the butter in a large saucepan. Add the chopped shallots, parsnips and potato.

I use shallots rather than an onion, since their flavor is a little milder, but if you can’t get your hands on shallots, one onion will work just fine.

For this soup in particular I like to add the spices before sweating the vegetables. This helps deepen the spicy flavors in the finished soup.

So, stir in the curry powder and ginger and mix the vegetables so they are completely coated in the spices.

Cover the pan and sweat the vegetables over medium heat for 10 minutes. Shake the pan occasionally to prevent sticking, but avoid lifting the lid and allowing the trapped steam escape.

Adding broth to parsnip soup

Add the stock and simmer for 20 minutes. Season with salt and pepper.

I like to add a good dash of pepper to this soup, but seasoning is a very personal step in any recipe. For my palate, pepper seems to compliment the flavor of the parsnips.

Adding chopped apple to parsnip soup

Next, add the chopped apple and simmer the soup for a further 10 minutes.

Parsnip soup prior to blending

Turn off the heat and allow the soup to cool slightly.

I love how the apple pieces just bob and bounce on the surface of the soup.

Adding cream to parsnip and apple soup

Purée the soup until the texture is completely smooth using an immersion blender or in batches using a liquidizer or blender.

Add the cream to the soup and mix through. Reheat gently, without boiling, before serving.

Parsnip, apple and curry soup in a shamrock bowl

And there, you have it – a simple soup made with a favorite Irish vegetable. I love to serve this soup with curried parsnip chips as a garnish – they’re simply delicious.

Here’s my printable recipe:

Parsnip and Apple Soup

Serves 6
Prep time 20 minutes
Cook time 50 minutes
Total time 1 hours, 10 minutes
Meal type Soup
Parsnips and apples, with a hint of curry, compliment each other perfectly in this creamy soup. The pairing of parsnips with apples intensifies their sweetness, with an added underlying warmth from the curry powder, making this soup truly satisfying.

Ingredients

  • 2oz butter
  • 2 shallots
  • 3 parsnips
  • 1 apple (Granny Smith or a cooking apple)
  • 1 potato (1 medium or 2 small)
  • 1 teaspoon curry powder (add extra for increased spiciness)
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 4 cups chicken stock
  • 1/2 cup whipping cream
  • salt and pepper to season

Directions

Step 1 Melt the butter in a large saucepan. Add the chopped shallots, parsnips and potato.
Step 2 Stir in the curry powder and ground ginger. Cover the pan and sweat the vegetables over medium heat for 10 minutes. Shake the pan occasionally to prevent sticking, but avoid lifting the lid and allowing the trapped steam escape.
Step 3 Add the stock and simmer for 20 minutes. Season with salt and pepper.
Step 4 Add the chopped apple and simmer for a further 10 minutes.
Step 5 Turn off the heat and allow the soup to cool slightly. Purée until smooth using an immersion blender or in batches using a liquidizer or blender.
Step 6 Add the cream to the soup and mix through. Reheat gently, without boiling, before serving.

Wishing you all happy soup making during these chilly days of fall and winter.

 

Slán agus beannacht leat!

(Goodbye and blessings)

 

Irish American Mom

 

P.S. My Irish shamrock soup bowl was made by Colm De Ris, an Irish potter.

The Irish American Influence – Guest Post By Brighid O’Sullivan

Brighid O’Sullivan grew up hearing Irish folk tales from her father in Western Massachusetts. She’s been writing short stories since she was a child and as an adult has written for History Magazine, History Channel magazine, and her local paper. She works full time as a nurse and has just published her debut novel, The Sun Palace, a story of history and magic set in 6th Century Ireland.

In today’s guest post, Brighid introduces us to the Irish American influences that have inspired her writing. 

 

The Sun Palace By Brighid O’Sullivan:

 

In 2007, I began writing my first novel, The Sun Palace. I knew nothing about Ireland or her history, had not known my great grandparents who emigrated to America, nor had I ever been to Ireland. What I did know about being Irish was given to me by my father, though that knowledge consisted of a few Irish folktales, playing records (yes, records!) made by Irish musicians, leprechauns my dad swore were like his guardian angels (an American view actually), rides on a St. Patrick’s day float in Holyoke Massachusetts, and lots of “blarney”. My dad was full of stories, most of which I did not believe.

Parade Happy

So why did I set my novel, The Sun Palace, in Ireland?

I started to read more than ever, which soon led me into European and Irish history, as well as novels written by Anne Rice, Morgan Llywelyn, Sebastian Barry, and Diana Gabaldon. I have a passion for anything historical and I love books. I collect and read all sorts of history, European as well as American, beginning and ending with Ireland, a place I grew to respect and love.

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Writing fiction is a laborious activity but writing historical fiction is even more so. There are all those research books one must read, buy, borrow, steal, and find!

I knew that, and like I said, I love history, but imagine trying to remember all those stories by heart like the druids did, or worse, what if books were actually forbidden? Lots of things were forbidden in the beginning of Ireland’s conquest by the English. To name a few, having an Irish name, Irish dress, and Irish trade, and we all know how the divisions of religion came to be.

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I read somewhere, there are more Irish in America than in all of Ireland! According to several statistics, 89,000 Irish emigrated from Ireland in 2013 but 55,000, many of them European, immigrated to Ireland! I believe that, because I’ve since been to Ireland twice and upon landing in Dublin for the first time, found myself saying, “so where are all the Irish?”

In one of my blog posts on my website Celtic Thoughts I talk about how if there was no Ireland there would be no America. For every accomplishment, from the beginning of America’s independence, to putting a man on the moon, Irish men and women have been part of the equation.

The fact that I am a writer goes back as far as the original bards in Celtic Ireland. ‘Tis in my blood and who I am. Blood that was shed for Ireland and America both … blood lost in wars, famines, mass emigration, prejudice and even death. I cannot help but feel grateful for such a sacrifice.

The Sun Palace

Oh and my idea for The Sun Palace? That grew from the kernel of a thought, after reading Tristan and Isolde, an Irish love story.

Check it out on Amazon and if you are generous enough to leave an honest review on the Amazon website, drop me an email about it @celticbrighid@gmail.com. I welcome all positive as well as constructive criticisms. As a much appreciated thank you, I will make sure you get my next published novel FREE.

My name is Brighid O’Sullivan and you can find me on Twitter, Pinterest, and on my website Celtic Thoughts writing about Irish and Irish American history.

 

Thanks so much, Brighid, for introducing us to your writing and your inspirations. Wishing you every success with The Sun Palace, and all of your future writing endeavors.

 

Slán agus beannacht leat!

(Goodbye and blessings)

 

Irish American Mom